Dino Flamethrower
DAVID GRZESIK | Visual Effects Artist

Dino Flamethrower

This is a little project I'm working on with Timmy Chiu, he will be lighting and I am working on the pyro effects. I have been having a few troubles as this is my first real pyro project, but have been learning quickly. Here are the two main video references I have been using:


Farmland Bacon: Flamethrower Cooking Challenge from Joe Cygan on Vimeo.


Dancing Pigeons — Ritalin from Rocketboom on Vimeo.


The biggest features I noticed were (1) How horizontal the flames came out, mainly directed by the shooting of the fuel (2) The flames never seem to go down, the smoke and flames all continue upwards (3) The lack of smoke overall, only coming in lightly at the very end (4) How defined some of the flames are, they are pretty distinct. Here is my most recent iteration:

DinoFlameThrower_v02 from David Grzesik on Vimeo.

I am currently sourcing from a quick particle simulation at the end of the video and do a bit of offseting on the volume to give it some nice variance. The biggest problem I have been having is getting the smoke to stay buoyant as it cools off. I believe this is because I have the pyro Cooling Rate at .942 and I'm hoping that if I start to tune that down then the volume will stay warmer, longer and continue its movement upwards. The problem with this is then the volume shoots up very quickly because it gets and stays so hot. In both video references the flamethrower continues out horizontally very steadily. The only thing I can attribute this behavior to is how much temperature is being released by burning the fuel. I'm not sure if a balance has to be struck here or if there is an attribute I am missing. I have the fuel immediately igniting with very little being transferred frame to frame (fuel inefficiency = .05).


My next tests will try to balance out the pyro Cooling Rate with the Temperature Output, but I'm thinking the solution might be deeper, rooting itself in the particle simulation. I'm not sure if changing the particle simulation to shoot out further with less gravity will create that longer stream and is worth testing. The only other thing I would like to test is getting the initial source of the fire itself from the inside of the Dinosaur's mouth to show up earlier, like where the reference flamethrower's have the pilot flame, as the fire only seems to start at the end of the mouth.


More updates to come!